Isle of Man border opens to allow family visits

a small boat in a body of water: The Isle of Man's border has been closed to most non-residents for more than a year © BBC The Isle of Man's border has been closed to most non-residents for more than a year

Isle of Man coronavirus border restrictions have been eased to allow non-resident family members to visit.

The island's border has been closed to almost all non-residents since March 2020, keeping some families apart for more than a year.

The relaxation also applies to partners and property owners but only those who live in the UK and Channel Islands.

Anyone who visits must isolate for seven days and pay £60 for two Covid-19 tests.

Following a second negative test, people can leave isolation but will face further restrictions for the next three days, including a ban on using public transport or visiting pubs, restaurants and theatres.

Exit Framework

Anyone visiting from further afield must isolate for 14 days.

Anyone planning to travel to the island must have an application for an exemption certificate approved before making the journey.

Under the government's Covid-19 Exit Framework the island's border is expected to open fully without the need for isolation on arrival from 28 June.

Chief Minister Howard Quayle said the relaxation had been made possible because of the island's progress with its vaccination programme and the fall in infection rates in the UK.

More than three quarters of the island's adult population have now received at least one dose of a Covid-19 vaccine.

There are currently 10 active cases of of the virus on the island, two of which are in Noble's Hospital with one receiving intensive care treatment.

Why not follow BBC Isle of Man on Facebook and Twitter? You can also send story ideas to northwest.newsonline@bbc.co.uk

Isle of Man border opens to allow family visits