Who Say Cannot: This Single Biker Mum Is A Food Delivery Rider

a group of people on a motorcycle: PHOTOS: RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS PHOTOS: RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS

PHOTOS: RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS

On any given day, Rafidah Binte Eunos, 33, has her hands full. Not only is she employed as a food delivery rider for Deliveroo, but she works ‘round the clock to raise her teenage daughter.

Rafidah previously worked as a human resources personnel for a food logistics company, but decided to try food delivery since it would allow her to plan her time around parenting. Being able to ride her beloved motorbike all day was an additional bonus.

“I have two passions in life: motorcycle and food,” Rafidah says. “It has been over two years since I joined Deliveroo as a food delivery rider, and I haven’t looked back.”

But trying to make it in a male-dominated field, while learning Singapore’s roads and dealing with home-based learning, was no walk in the park.

a person in a car posing for the camera: PHOTOS: RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS PHOTOS: RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS

PHOTOS: RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS

Becoming a mum at a young age

Rafidah is no stranger to challenges, as she had her now 15-year-old daughter when she was still a teenager herself.

“It has not been an easy journey, as on top of being a young mum, I was in an unhappy marriage for close to five years,” Rafidah says. “I felt alone during that period and fell into a depression. I decided to leave the situation for my mental health and my daughter's sake, and it’s been the best decision I ever made.”

“I’m proud to be an independent single mother who earns a living for my family by myself, and my daughter motivates me to do better every day. Being a mother has taught me to be strong and resilient through the most challenging times. I’m very grateful for all the bumps in the road as it has led my family to where we are today.”

Riders look out for each other

“I had doubts during the initial weeks of riding with Deliveroo and was worried that I couldn't fulfil my orders as I wasn't familiar with the roads in Singapore,” Rafidah shares.

“However, as I am quite the tomboy and grew up spending more time with male friends, it was easy for me to make friends with other food delivery riders on the road. Deliveroo has a great rider community in Singapore, and everyone is super helpful and supportive in sharing tips. Like male food delivery riders, I'm here to earn a living to support myself and my daughter, so there is nothing a man can do that a woman can't.”

a person holding a pair of people posing for the camera: RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS

PHOTOS: RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS

What the onslaught of COVID-19 meant for Rafidah

Time management was key to making home-based learning work for Rafidah and her daughter. When schools were closed during the circuit breaker period, Rafidah would ensure that her daughter attended her virtual classes at 9 am before hopping on her motorbike between 11 am to 2 pm. After coming home, she would assist her daughter with homework and do household chores before completing additional orders between 5 pm to 9 pm.

As busy as it was, Rafidah appreciates the freedom she had to plan her time.

“It is easy to juggle work and family life as I’m in charge of my hours. If my daughter needs me, I can stop taking orders anytime and attend to her needs. The flexible working arrangement is a huge benefit for me as I don’t need to apply for leave from work to attend matters such as parent-teacher meetings.”

Never a dull day when out riding

“After spending a lot of time riding around Singapore, I realise there are many wildlife species roaming about our Little Red Dot. Besides meeting fellow Deliveroo riders on the road, friendly restaurant staff and customers, I’ve encountered a wild monkey in the middle of the road. I didn’t want to anger the monkey, so I stopped my bike and said ‘after you’ to let it cross the road first, haha. I’ve even come across a snake in a condominium compound!”

Rafidah was also happy to share what it is like being a young single mum to a teenager in this day and age.

a row of parked motorcycles sitting on the side of a road: PHOTOS: RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS PHOTOS: RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS

PHOTOS: RAFIDAH BINTE EUNOS

Taking up a dual role in the household

“While I may be considered young, my daughter certainly keeps me younger and in tune with the latest trends,” Rafidah says. “Today’s children grow up so fast and there’s always something new with them - I can’t count the number of times my daughter has tried to make me do a TikTok dance challenge!”

“My daughter has also taught me to have patience and be calm. I’ve gone through some past hardships and have built a hard exterior to protect myself, especially having to take on the mum and dad role after my divorce. I’ve most definitely softened up now!”

My daughter is my….

“Best friend. We may be brutally honest with each other, but there’s always respect and trust. As a teenager, my daughter has her way of doing things, and I will take a step back to allow her to develop her independence. I think it is essential to allow her to make her own mistakes to learn from and grow. If she needs my advice, I will be there for her. We tell each other everything, and no topic is ever off-limits.”

Should more mums join the food delivery industry?

“I always remind myself and my daughter to have an open mind and be mentally strong in every life situation,” Rafidah says. “I think this applies to other mothers, especially single mums, out there who are juggling work and family life. I also believe that we shouldn’t limit ourselves and be open to different experiences. I’d definitely encourage more mothers to join Deliveroo as a food delivery rider as you can create your hours to earn a living and be present for your kids.”

Who Say Cannot: This Single Biker Mum Is A Food Delivery Rider