Liberation Day celebrations held island-wide

a group of police officers riding on the back of a truck: About 100 military and classic vehicles visited all 10 of Guernsey's parishes in a cavalcade © BBC About 100 military and classic vehicles visited all 10 of Guernsey's parishes in a cavalcade

Guernsey has marked Liberation Day with events across the island, in a change to traditional celebrations.

Usually events are focussed in St Peter Port, but people have been encouraged to stay local in light of coronavirus.

Family fun days, afternoon teas and live music are among events commemorating the 76th anniversary of liberation from German military rule.

A parade of about 100 military and classic vehicles traversed the island and an occupation statue was unveiled.

a group of people riding on the back of a truck: People lined roads around the island to watch the vehicles pass © BBC People lined roads around the island to watch the vehicles pass a person holding a sign: Both the Guernsey and Union flags were waved by spectators © BBC Both the Guernsey and Union flags were waved by spectators

Guernsey's cavalcade normally travels from Pembroke to St Peter Port, but instead used an island-wide route beginning this year as part of alternative celebrations.

People lined roads to see the procession, which began at Torteval Church at 14:00 BST and wound round the island's 10 parishes.

a group of people riding on the back of a pickup truck: The parade making its way to St Peter Port along the eastern seafront © BBC The parade making its way to St Peter Port along the eastern seafront a group of people riding on the back of a motorcycle: The cavalcade passing through St Saviour © BBC The cavalcade passing through St Saviour

The commemorative statue unveiled on the seafront in St Peter Port was intended to be part of Liberation 75 celebrations, but this was postponed by the first Covid-19 lockdown last year when virtual ceremonies were held.

The sculpture was created by artist Mark Cook, who said it had been "in its own little bubble" as a result of the pandemic.

He said: "Hopefully it is a sort of a marker we're coming out of this pandemic, that we're moving into more normal times."

a statue of a man and a woman walking down a street: The statue was supposed to be unveiled in 2020 for Liberation 75 © BBC The statue was supposed to be unveiled in 2020 for Liberation 75

The family depicted were modelled on four local people, a man, a woman and two children, as an "expression of who we are and how we come together", Mr Cook explained.

"It's about liberation now, but also about the past and that connection with the generation before."

a person sitting on a sidewalk: It was unveiled on the St Peter Port seafront by former Bailiff Sir Richard Collas © BBC It was unveiled on the St Peter Port seafront by former Bailiff Sir Richard Collas

Former Bailiff of Guernsey Sir Richard Collas said it was "very exciting" to finally be able to unveil the statue.

It was originally intended to be his last public duty, ahead of his retirement in May last year.

He said: "I can now feel truly liberated. It's very exciting to come back and I'm delighted to have been asked.

"If this had been my final act, I would have been able to say it was one of my happiest and proudest days and I still feel that," Sir Richard added.

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Liberation Day celebrations held island-wide